I took a trip into history

Listen to the Jerry Springer Podcast Show

I took a trip into history

I went to Ashland and Morehead, Kentucky, today to do two things: watch for my podcast duties the goings on at the Federal Court hearing of Kim Davis, the Rowan County clerk who refused to obey a Supreme Court order to give out marriage licenses to her citizens regardless of their sexual preference, and to hand deliver to Mrs. Davis or her office a letter from the Jerry Springer Podcast inviting her to be a guest on our show. (I’m the producer.) During the hearing, after the judge heard her reasons for refusing to do her sworn duty, and testimony from a lesbian woman, a college professor who actually voted for Democrat Mrs. Davis, saying how hurt she felt being unable to simply get the license to marry in her own community, he sent Mrs. Davis out, I assume, to a jail cell.
And since all of the county clerks were also in court, their office was closed when I passed through Morehead on the way back home even making a drop off impossible.
But, damn, the court visit was riveting.
I spent half my time outside the courthouse watching a modern version of what the Scopes Monkey trial in Dayton, Tennessee, in 1925, must have looked like with the pro and anti evolution sides squaring off in front of that courthouse as teacher John Scopes faced prosecution for imparting instructional content Christians abhorred. I’m not raising Kim Davis to Scopes’ status – they’re actually on opposite sides – but the dynamics were similarly charged and chaotic.
Then a cop told me a seat opened up in the courtroom for a reporter, and I quickly got searched, turned over my electronic gear and soon get a seat two rows behind the defendants, Davis and her deputies.
So I got to hear her testimony as well as the complainant’s. But the most interesting part was the ruling of the judge, that she had to do her job since she took the oath. And since he was pretty sure some deep pocketed right wingers would donate all the money he could state in fines (my words, not his), jail was the only fix. And off she went, saying, “Thanks, judge.”
If heroine was what she wanted, she got it. Time will tell how long she’ll bake there, but in the meantime, five of her six deputies told the judge they’d give out marriage licenses in Rowan County, Kentucky.

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